Brexit

6

My occasional blog posts are normally business related. I certainly avoid politics. However, the referendum outcome falls into an entirely different category.

We are on the brink of doing somethingLooking into abyss both immensely daft and irreversible. Society has some huge challenges and growing inequality has to be addressed. Demagogues, knaves and some well meaning, but misguided, individuals are taking advantage of this unhappiness and peddling a false dawn. This will affect our lives and our children’s lives.

For many years politicians knew better than to call a referendum on capital punishment because they knew they would get the ‘wrong’ answer. This wasn’t a rejection of democracy, but a recognition that people sometimes do daft things and very few have the time or inclination to immerse themselves in the issues and alternatives. We expect far more engagement, thought and debate from our politicians.

I should have seen the danger and opposed the referendum when it was announced. I should certainly have pushed for something so fundamental and irreversible to require more than a simple majority. I failed on both fronts.

However, I think it incumbent on me and like-minded individuals to do what we can now. This is not whinging because we ‘lost’. This is a response to an existential crisis for our nation. There is time for sanity to prevail and we must persuade our politicians that they can and must stop Brexit. Yes they will be criticised and their careers may also be damaged. But it is their duty to stand tall and do the right thing.

6 comments on “Brexit

  1. Sue Gouldman says:

    Hi Richard Thanks for your latest post. What do you think can realistically be done to change the dreadful direction in which we now appear to be heading? Sue

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    • It will be the new Tory leader that needs to sign article 50. I think all of the likely front-runners know that exit will cause real problems and neither want this as their legacy nor to have to spend their time as leader dealing with the fall-out.

      We need to provide the Tory leader – as well as MPs from all parties – with the encouragement and knowledge that if they find a face saving formula to avoid leaving the EU there will be widespread public support.

  2. Stuart Lindenfield says:

    Nicely put Richard. (And Hi to Sue if you’re reading ..). I assume you’ve already signed the petition?? Best wishes, Stuart
    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/131215

  3. Philip Baker says:

    Richard
    Goodness me …….the arrogance of your comments are quite stupefying………….the remain camp was one of self interest and complete ignorance and disregard for the proven fact that the European project is deeply flawed and in pieces . The only way to stimulate any fundamental change was to vote out ……….Cameron had his greatest negotiating strength pre referendum but the arrogant EU sent him packing with tit bits ….if they had the disdain to do that then imagine how empowered they would be now if we voted remain.
    However I am not convinced that Brexit will still happen ….IF THE EU HAVE ANY SENSE AND STOP THEIR PLAYGROUND ANTICS THEN WE ALL …IE EU AND US COULD NEGOTIATE A FUNDEMENTAL RESTRUCTURE ….ie A FREE TRADE AREA AS ORIGINALLY PROPOSED AND NOT A FEDERAL EUROPE TO THE MASSIVE ADVANTAGE OF YOU KNOW WHO!!
    PS Of course immigration was indeed a red herring.

  4. Hi Philip – Thank you for taking the time to post a comment. Yes – the EU is flawed. However, we are so bound in – legally and economically – that extricating ourselves will be very damaging over an extended period. The skills and industries our economy has developed are not ones that lend themselves to an isolationist stance – and we will be isolated for a while post Brexit. The cost to us of EU inefficiency is far lower than the cost to us of being outside. As the second largest economy in Europe we would have been better using our strengths to campaign for change and not making ourselves the bogeyman.

    Meanwhile – closer ties to your neighbours is no bad thing. Indeed for some – including me – it is something to be enjoyed and I believe we will be diminished as outsiders.

    • philip baker says:

      Richard
      Everything(almost) you say is correct but someone has to explain to me how staying in is going to “fundementally” change the EU….it has very much overstretched its hand and displayed child like arrogance in its treatment of Cameron and by direct implication UK plc. Leaving the EU is not isolationist on the world stage. This is not about short term cost and implications relating thereto but creating the only way of changing the EU back to what it should be ….ie a “Common Market” and not a federal unit bent on creating laws and regulations that cannot be the benefit of the individual countries and cultures.
      I for one am prepared for short term pain for long term gain. As you say we are a powerful economy and if our EU friends have maturity and professionalism they will get over their shock and get on with embracing structural changes …..have you seen the latest spite from MEP’s recently in EU parliament. I negotiate for a living and when it gets personal there is always a good reason.

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